September 9th, 2014

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via nimben)

asylum-art:

Magical Paths Begging To Be Walked

Roads and paths pervade our literature, poetry, artwork, linguistic expressions and music. Even photographers can’t keep their eyes (and lenses) off of a beautiful road or path, which is why we collected this list of 28 amazing photos of paths.

Paths like these have a powerful grip on the human imagination – they can bring adventure, promise and change or solitude, peace and calm. There’s nothing like a walk down a beautiful path to clear your head – or to fill it with ideas!

I’ll leave you with an excellent quote from J. R. R. Tolkien’s works while you enjoy these images; “It’s a dangerous business, Frodo, going out your door. You step onto the road, and if you don’t keep your feet, there’s no knowing where you might be swept off to.

  1. Autumn In The White Carpathians
  2. Rhododendron Laden Path, Mount Rogers, Virginia, USA
  3. Spring In Hallerbos Forest, Belgium
  4. Autumn Path In Kyoto, Japan 
  5. Autumn Path
  6. Bamboo Path In Kyoto, Japan
  7. Hitachi Seaside Park Path In Japan
  8. Dark Hedges In Ireland
  9. Winter Forest Path, Czech Republic
  10. Path Under Blooming Trees In Spring

(via nimben)

(Source: i-thescientist, via nimben)

distant-traveller:

Galactic wheels within wheels

How many rings do you see in this striking new image of the galaxy Messier 94 (NGC 4736) as seen by the infrared eyes of NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope? While at first glance one might see a number of them, astronomers believe there is just one.
Historically, Messier 94 was considered to have two strikingly different rings: a brilliant, compact band encircling the galaxy’s core, and a faint, broad, swath of stars falling outside its main disk.
Astronomers have recently discovered that the outer ring, seen here in the deep blue glow of starlight, may actually be more of an optical illusion. This more complete picture of Messier 94 indicates that we are really seeing two separate spiral arms that, from our perspective, take on the appearance of a single, unbroken ring.
The bright inner ring of Messier 94 is very real, however. This area is sometimes identified as a “starburst ring” because of the frenetic pace of star formation in this confined area. Starbursts like this can often be triggered by gravitational encounters with other galaxies, but in this case may instead be caused by the galaxy’s oval shape.
Tucked in between the inner starburst ring and the outer ring-like arms we find the galaxy’s disk, striated with greenish filaments of dust. While, at first glance, these dusty arcs look like a collection of rings, they actually follow tightly wound spiral arcs.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SINGS Team

distant-traveller:

Galactic wheels within wheels

How many rings do you see in this striking new image of the galaxy Messier 94 (NGC 4736) as seen by the infrared eyes of NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope? While at first glance one might see a number of them, astronomers believe there is just one.

Historically, Messier 94 was considered to have two strikingly different rings: a brilliant, compact band encircling the galaxy’s core, and a faint, broad, swath of stars falling outside its main disk.

Astronomers have recently discovered that the outer ring, seen here in the deep blue glow of starlight, may actually be more of an optical illusion. This more complete picture of Messier 94 indicates that we are really seeing two separate spiral arms that, from our perspective, take on the appearance of a single, unbroken ring.

The bright inner ring of Messier 94 is very real, however. This area is sometimes identified as a “starburst ring” because of the frenetic pace of star formation in this confined area. Starbursts like this can often be triggered by gravitational encounters with other galaxies, but in this case may instead be caused by the galaxy’s oval shape.

Tucked in between the inner starburst ring and the outer ring-like arms we find the galaxy’s disk, striated with greenish filaments of dust. While, at first glance, these dusty arcs look like a collection of rings, they actually follow tightly wound spiral arcs.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SINGS Team

(via obe)

itstimetodisappear:

The Moon and Stars
28 images combined, each with a 15 second exposure. Taken around 8:30pm at Caspersen Beach, Florida. Stacked using Waguila’s star stacker program and the star spikes program for the diffraction effect. 
Photographed by: Paolo Nacpil

itstimetodisappear:

The Moon and Stars

28 images combined, each with a 15 second exposure. Taken around 8:30pm at Caspersen Beach, Florida. Stacked using Waguila’s star stacker program and the star spikes program for the diffraction effect. 

Photographed by: Paolo Nacpil

(via obe)

欲しいものリストといえば昔、全然存じ上げない方からプレゼントをいただいて、若干値の張る専門書だったのでさすがに支払おうと思い連絡したら「先日お世話になった鶴です」って言い張られて受け取ってもらえなかったことがあります。私もいつかこの文化相続しようと思う。
September 7th, 2014
catasters:

How To Get X-Ray Vision…

catasters:

How To Get X-Ray Vision…

(via obe)

ヤマザキ:いろいろなピンチはありましたよ。先述した通り、イタリアで商売に失敗し、せっかく購入した家も何もかも抵当に取られ、子供をひとりで産むハメにもなり、もうそれ以上人生をやっていく自信が自分からすーっと消えてなくなった時もありました。ひとつのどん底でしたけど、その時に、やっぱりこの世で自分を支えていくのは自分しかいないんだ、ということを痛感しました。それは14歳でひとり、ヨーロッパに旅をして、道に迷った時に初めて芽生えた思いだったのですが、今にいたるまで、自分の芯になっていることは確かです。

 なんだかんだで人間は頑強にできています。目先の小石につまづいて、「ああ…」ってなっても、大股で歩けば、そんな小石のことなんか気にならなくなる。だから、人生を長いスパンで見ていくということも大事でしょうね。